Explorer Reaches Bottom of the Mariana Trench, Breaks Record for Deepest Dive Ever

Explorer Reaches Bottom of the Mariana Trench, Breaks Record for Deepest Dive Ever

  • Explorer and businessman Victor Vescovo descended 35,853 feet into the Pacific Ocean, breaking the record for deepest dive ever.
  • Until now, only two people have successfully made it to the bottom of Challenger Deep, the planet’s deepest point at the southern end of the Mariana Trench.
  • Back in 1960, oceanographer Don Walsh was the first to make it down to the trench successfully, reaching about 35,814 feet.
  • “Over 50 years later, Canadian explorer and filmmaker James Cameron took the first solo dive and reached a depth of 35,787 feet. In the recent dive, Walsh accompanied a team up above on the ship, as Vescovo descended alone in a submersible called the DSV Limiting Factor. It took 3.5 to 4 hours to reach the record-breaking depth – a flat, beige basin covered with a thick layer of silt. From inside the submersible designed to withstand extreme pressures, he spent hours observing and documenting the quiet, dark alien world. It was chilly; it was quiet; and”it was so very peaceful,” he told Live Science.
  • After Vescovo’s record-breaking dive, other team members took four other subsequent dives to the trench.
  • “Honestly, toward the end, I simply turned the thrusters off, leaned back in the cockpit and enjoyed a tuna fish sandwich while I very slowly drifted just above the bottom of the deepest place on Earth, enjoying the view and appreciating what the team had done technically,” Vescovo said.
  • In the months leading up to this dive, the explorer reached the deepest points of the Atlantic, Southern and Indian oceans as part of the Five Deeps Expedition, which aims to reach the bottom of every ocean on the planet.